ashtanga yoga classes

At triyoga we offer 50 Ashtanga yoga classes and five daily Mysore programmes a week across five locations in London. The physical ashtanga practice synchronises breath, asana (postures) and drishti (gaze point) to create a dynamic, flowing sequence and build an internal heat. This powerful combination helps bring strength and stability to the body, purify the nervous system and calm the mind.

We offer led classes and traditional Mysore-style self-practice classes, taught by some of the UK’s leading teachers. Whether you are a complete beginner or a more experienced student, we have an Ashtanga yoga class to suit you.

book an ashtanga yoga class

ashtanga yoga class locations + times

What is Ashtanga?

Ashtanga yoga is a dynamic practice that comes from Mysore in India. It’s here that Pattabhi Jois developed and popularised the system, teaching at the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute (now KPJAYI) from the mid-20th Century. It’s one of the most popular forms of yoga in the West and has influenced many other styles – including Jivamukti, Vinyasa Flow and Rocket.

The practice follows a set sequence of postures, starting with sun salutations, then standing and seated postures, and finally a finishing sequence and rest. In total, there are six series of postures that students learn gradually – but many if not most people find everything they need in the first and most important, the primary series.

“Ashtanga” literally means “eight limbs” and refers to the eight limbs of yoga detailed in Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras. These limbs describe various stages of a holistic yoga practice, from lifestyle to enlightenment, encouraging you to take the practice off the mat and into your everyday life.

What can I expect from an Ashtanga yoga class?

You’ll work through a set sequence and synchronise your breath with movement as you transition between each posture. This combination of breath and movement is known as “vinyasa” and it’s what makes Ashtanga so dynamic. It also becomes the focus on the practice, helping you develop concentration and calm the mind.

If you are new to yoga, you might find a led ashtanga class challenging at first. The teacher will help you to work safely and provide modifications if needed. Wherever you are, the central part of the practice is always the breath.

There’s also a strong community aspect to Ashtanga, with students and teachers often connecting both inside and outside the studio.

Learn more about the fundamentals of the practice by watching the video below featuring Mysore-style self-practice teacher Corrie Ananda Preece.

What is the difference between an Ashtanga class and Mysore-style self-practice class?

Quite a lot. Mysore-style classes are named after the city of Mysore and follow the traditional self-practice format. A Mysore-style class is not led but rather students learn the sequence posture-by-posture and practise at their own pace and rhythm. Sometimes described as a one-to-one private class in a group setting, the teacher travels the room quietly helping with physical adjustments and verbal instruction.

You don’t need to know the sequence of postures to come to a Mysore-style class. And you don’t need to be flexible or strong to start – complete beginners and people of all ages are always welcome. The teacher will work with you individually to guide you through the practice.

A Mysore-style class might take place over three or four hours but you can come at any time during the session for any length of time. To begin with, your practice might last about 30 minutes and will grow the more you attend.

What are the benefits of Ashtanga yoga?

Moving with the breath builds a therapeutic internal heat. This powerful practice helps bring strength and stability to the body, purify the nervous system and calm the mind. It’s also a very energising practice that’s great for improving blood circulation.

But the benefits go far beyond physical fitness. The practice develops focus and concentration and helps train the mind to react calmly, no matter what situation you find yourself in. Ultimately, this is a spiritual practice that can lead to deep and profound personal transformation.

Are Ashtanga classes at triyoga suitable for beginners?

Absolutely. Traditionally, ashtanga is always taught in a Mysore self-practice setting, where you learn the sequence at your own pace, one posture at a time. If you are a total beginner, they are a great way to start. Our led classes offer a way to experience more of the sequence but in a led setting where you are all moving together.

Does triyoga have Ashtanga classes for advanced students?

We do. In three of our centres, we have classes that teach the full primary series – 46 postures plus the closing sequence. The class is counted in Sanskrit and is particularly suited to Mysore practitioners to help them refine their technique.

How much do Ashtanga classes cost at triyoga?

You can attend any Ashtanga or Mysore self-practice class with any of our class pricing options. View all pricing options here. If you’re new to triyoga we recommend:

30 days of unlimited classes for £54.

class levels

what do the class levels mean?

Classes are divided into styles of yoga, but also levels. Check with your teacher before moving up a level and always inform your teacher if you are pregnant or have any injuries.

open level

Open to all levels from beginners to more experienced. The teacher adapts the class according to the students.

level 1

Open to complete beginners, those in the initial stages of yoga practice or those seeking a gentler asana practice. You will learn the fundamentals of yoga.

level 1-2

Builds on the foundational blocks that are established in a Level 1 class. A working knowledge of yoga principles is expected.

level 2

Works on deeper physical and psychological level. Introduces more sophisticated practices that may include more challenging postures (inversions, deeper backbends) as well as pranayama, mudra and meditation. Not suitable for beginners.

level 2-3

Teaches more difficult postures and breathing techniques. Assumes an understanding of the gross as well as subtle aspects of practice.

level 3

A challenging class for the experienced student who possesses deep awareness on both a physical and mental level. Definitely not for the faint-hearted.